Posts Tagged ‘visa’

Visas for Canadians to go to Mexico

This information is taken from the Mexican Consulate General web site in Vancouver, BC, Canada

May 8, 2010

Visas

Canadian and U.S. citizens, as well as minors, do not require a visa to visit Mexico for up to 180 days; however, the immigration officer at the port of entry will determine the exact authorized period for each tourist, which is up to a maximum of six months. Visitors are required to have a Mexican tourist card, which can be obtained upon presentation of proof of citizenship (i.e. passport, birth certificate or citizenship card, plus a driver’s license or an official I.D.) The Mexican tourist card can be obtained at this Consulate, airlines or at the port of entry. (more…)

Changes to the travel requirements for Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada

This information is provided courtesy of the Mexican Consulate General in Vancouver, BC

As of March 1st, 2010, the Government of Mexico requires new documentation to enter Mexico under a “tourist status”. (more…)

FM3 first time and renewals

Below is a list of costs, requirements and procedures to obtain an FM3 for the first time or to submit for the annual renewal. Processing time is typically 6 weeks for first time documents and 4 weeks for renewals, changes and permits.

First time:

See this page to complete the application

Obtaining and renewing FM3 or FM2 documents

In addition to obtaining and renewing migratory documents, it is important to consider permits and notifications once you have one. See our article on such procedures. Below we have summarized the procedures and requirements for obtaining and renewing your visa (migratory document such as FM3 or FM2).

See our handy citizenship study guide reference here.

You can get the FM3 before leaving your home country at a Mexican embassy or consulate, then must register it (similar to applying again) upon arrival in Mexico or can apply for the first time once you are in Mexico and before your tourist card expires.

An FM2 is what most people obtain after having an FM3 for five years. It is a less restrictive form of residency or immigrant permit for foreigners in Mexico. After the FM2, residents often seek citizenship. (more…)

IdeaCOM does not review, endorse, approve or control, and is not responsible for any sites linked from or to this site, the content of those sites, the third parties named therein, or their products and services.